New tools show City of Edmonton’s pesticide usage
This Open Data map shows where biological pesticides were applied by helicopter for mosquito control in 2018.

This Open Data map shows where biological pesticides were applied by helicopter for mosquito control in 2018.

The City of Edmonton has launched two new tools to visually show where city crews plan to apply pesticides each day as well as GPS data on where crews have already treated for mosquitoes. Edmonton is one of the first municipalities in Canada to use such tools.

“The City of Edmonton is committed to being transparent when it comes to where, how, why and when we apply pesticides,” said Mike Jenkins, coordinator of Pest Management.

“These tools allow citizens to get this information in a timely and visual format.”

Each day, City crews will upload where they plan to be that day, what chemical they are using and for what purpose. Citizens can see this information on a map for the various types of pests we address such as mosquitoes, tree insects and weeds. The Pesticide Public Notification Map can be found at edmonton.ca/pesticidenotification.

The City is also using GPS technology to record where helicopter and truck crews have treated for mosquitoes. This information will be uploaded into the Open Data Catalogue within a few weeks of application. Past records from 2018 are available.

The City of Edmonton’s Integrated Pest Management strategies focus on minimizing the use of pesticides while ensuring the maximum effectiveness of its pest management programs. All pest control products and procedures the City of Edmonton uses meet strict standards established by Health Canada through the Pest Control Products Act. The City of Edmonton’s pesticide applicators are trained to the required standards of Alberta Environment and Parks.

Noxious and Prohibited Noxious weeds are identified by the Government of Alberta. Provincial regulation requires the City to control noxious weeds growth and prevent spread. In 2015, City Council approved a cosmetic herbicide ban with exceptions, one of which is the use of herbicides to control prohibited and noxious weeds.

Orange Hawkweed, shown above, is listed as a prohibited noxious invasive weed. Infestations have been recently identified in Edmonton. Work is underway to eliminate these populations and bring the species back under control. This species outcompetes native vegetation and can cause vegetative matting which prevents biodiversity.

Orange Hawkweed, shown above, is listed as a prohibited noxious invasive weed. Infestations have been recently identified in Edmonton. Work is underway to eliminate these populations and bring the species back under control. This species outcompetes native vegetation and can cause vegetative matting which prevents biodiversity.

For more information:
edmonton.ca/pesticidenotification
edmonton.ca/opendata
edmonton.ca/pests
edmonton.ca/weeds

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