Garlic Mustard Pull

When I first heard the words Garlic Mustard, I thought it must be a new condiment from Fat Franks. After attending one of the Garlic Mustard pull meetings held by City of Edmonton and the Edmonton Naturalization Group I learned that Garlic Mustard is actually a plant. And it is not just any plant; it’s a non-native, invasive plant, also known as a weed that grows in the Mill Creek Ravine here in Edmonton.  It can be destructive to native biodiversity and habitat, suppresses local plant growth and take over large areas in woodland areas. Garlic Mustard is listed as a “prohibited noxious” weed under the Alberta Weed Control Act, meaning it must be destroyed.

Removing Garlic Mustard helps maintain the natural beauty of the Mill Creek Ravine and plant diversity in the area. It is better for the environment when we hand pull Garlic Mustard as oppose to just destroying it by chemicals. In a natural area like the Mill Creek Ravine, the use of synthetic herbicides is only recommended when there are no other options available because synthetic herbicides can kill desired plants.

The impact of community weed pulling is more important than just eradicating this invasive species. This ravine is shared by everyone in the neighbourhood and makes this area unique and attractive. It is up to everyone to prevent the ravine from being taken over by invasive plants and destroying its natural beauty.

There is a group that will organize a garlic mustard pull four times this year. Please join us to help pull Garlic Mustard from Mill Creek Ravine

  1. Saturday, May 26, 2012, 9:30 am – 11:30 am
  2. Tuesday, June 5, 2012, 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
  3. Saturday, July 7, 2012, 9:30 am – 11:30 am
  4. Thursday, August 2, 2012, 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Meeting point is on corner of 91 St and 77 Ave.

Garlic Mustard Pull Poster 2012

 

 

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About the Author
Cory Cheung
Cory Cheung, Co-op student with the City of Edmonton, Urban Planning and Environment Branch, Office of Environment. Born in Hong Kong, lived in Miami and Vancouver. Currently a 3rd year Geography Major at Simon Fraser University. Also completing certificates in Urban Studies, Sustainable Community Development, and GIS. Interested in environmental and sustainability issues.
2 Comments
  1. 6 years ago

    Pull it and then eat it. Garlic Mustard is commonly eaten in Europe. Add it to a salad, make pesto. It’s like doing the eco-system and your hunger a favour.

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